Nutrition

10-12 years old

  1. Water, water, water! Most kids don’t drink enough water and mistake hunger for thirst. Remember, a good general guideline is to drink half your weight in ounces per day. Be careful to avoid carbonated sodas during training as carbonation counteracts muscle recovery. Also avoid sugary drinks, especially those using artificial colors and sweeteners. Your body was not designed to process artificial compounds and can wreak havoc on your body’s ability to process them.
  2. Make sure you’re getting enough protein. Most kids load up on the carbs but miss the protein. The most critical time to get protein is right after a workout or practice as this feeds your muscles with the critical building blocks needed to restore and rebuild muscle fibers to help you get stronger and be able to play longer. Protein comes in many different forms, but the best for building lean muscle is the whey protein found in milk. Also, make sure you’re getting protein with every meal, not just at dinner. You need about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight. Depending on your weight, this averages about 34 grams per day. A cup of milk has about 8 grams.
  3. Avoid junk food until after practice. Let’s face it, we all enjoy indulgences here and kids are certainly no exception. This food tastes amazing and unfortunately, is designed from the manufacturers with that thought in mind. Although chips, fries, and sweets are obvious candidates in this list, others that are not so obvious are foods that may appear healthy but are loaded with simple sugars, trans fats, and tons of chemicals. Some examples here are sweetened yogurts, anything fried (even vegetables), soft drinks, most sports and energy drinks to name a few.

14-16 years old

    1. Water, water, water!  Most kids don’t drink enough water and mistake hunger for thirst.  Remember, a good general guideline is to drink half your weight in ounces per day.  Be careful to avoid carbonated sodas during training as carbonation counteracts muscle recovery.  Also avoid sugary drinks, especially those using artificial colors and sweeteners.  Your body was not designed to process artificial compounds and can wreak havoc on your body’s ability to process them.
    2. Make sure you’re getting enough protein.  Most kids load up on the carbs but miss the protein.  The most critical time to get protein is right after a workout or practice as this feeds your muscles with the critical building blocks needed to restore and rebuild muscle fibers to help you get stronger and be able to play longer.  Protein comes in many different forms, but the best for building lean muscle is the whey protein found in milk.  Also, make sure you’re getting protein with every meal, not just at dinner.  You need about 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight.  Depending on your weight, this averages about 50 grams per day.  A cup of milk has about 8 grams.  When having a meal, also make sure it’s balanced with carbs and fat.  The best calorie ratio is 40:30:30 carbs, fat, and protein.  This can be challenging as most meals tend to be higher in carbs and fat, especially breakfast.  
    3. Avoid junk food until after practice.  Let’s face it, we all enjoy indulgences here and kids are certainly no exception.  This food tastes amazing and unfortunately, is designed from the manufacturers with that thought in mind.   Although chips, fries, and sweets are obvious candidates in this list, others that are not so obvious are foods that may appear healthy but are loaded with simple sugars, trans fats, and tons of chemicals.  Some examples here are sweetened yogurts, anything fried (even vegetables), soft drinks, most sports and energy drinks to name a few.
    4. At least one serving of fruits and veggies.  I know, I know, no one likes this category.  Just start with one serving of each per day, which is about a fistful.  The nutritional benefits are huge; lots of micronutrients that your body needs to help all the processes in your body run much more efficiently, plus tons of fiber that aids in good digestion.  The best option here is uncooked and unprocessed.  An apple is better than apple juice, baby carrots are better than Veggie Crisps, etc.

18+ years old

  1. Water, water, water!  Most people don’t drink enough water and mistake hunger for thirst.  Remember, a good general guideline is to drink half your weight in ounces per day.  Be careful to avoid carbonated sodas during training as carbonation counteracts muscle recovery.  Also avoid sugary drinks, especially those using artificial colors and sweeteners.  Your body was not designed to process artificial compounds and can wreak havoc on your body’s ability to process them.
  2. Make sure you’re getting enough protein.   Most people load up on the carbs but miss the protein.  The most critical time to get protein is right after a workout or practice as this feeds your muscles with the critical building blocks needed to restore and rebuild muscle fibers to help you get stronger and be able to play longer.  Protein comes in many different forms, but the best for building lean muscle is the whey protein found in milk.  Also, make sure you’re getting protein with every meal, not just at dinner.  You need up to 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight, depending on your activity level.  For adult women, this should be at least 46 grams per day, while adult men should have at least 56 grams per day.  A cup of milk has about 8 grams.  When having a meal, also make sure it’s balanced with carbs and fat.  The best calorie ratio is 40:30:30 carbs, fat, and protein.  This can be challenging as most meals tend to be higher in carbs and fat, especially breakfast.  
  3. Avoid junk food until after practice.  Let’s face it, we all enjoy indulgences here. This food tastes amazing and unfortunately, is designed from the manufacturers with that thought in mind.   Although chips, fries, and sweets are obvious candidates in this list, others that are not so obvious are foods that may appear healthy but are loaded with simple sugars, trans fats, and tons of chemicals.  Some examples here are sweetened yogurts, anything fried (even vegetables), soft drinks, most sports and energy drinks to name a few.
  4. At least one serving of fruits and veggies.  I know, I know, no one likes this category.  Just start with one serving of each per day, which is about a fistful.  The nutritional benefits are huge; lots of micronutrients that your body needs to help all the processes in your body run much more efficiently, plus tons of fiber that aids in good digestion.  The best option here is uncooked and unprocessed.  An apple is better than apple juice, baby carrots are better than Veggie Crisps, etc.

 

Click here for more information on kid-friendly nutrition